Roosevelt Dinner

On Saturday, April 7, the San Diego County Democratic Party held its 38th Annual Roosevelt Dinner, called “Building the Big Blue Wave,” at the Hilton San Diego Bayfront.  Around 1,000 Democratic leaders, candidates, activists and friends came together to affirm our values, celebrate our successes, honor our heroes, and recommit to fight for equality, justice and opportunity for all.

Among the guests attending were 10 members of the Coronado Democratic Club: Councilwoman Carrie Downey, President Frank King and his wife Joan, Vice-President Tom Bernitt, Treasurer Patrick Callahan and his wife Debbie, Patti and Chuck Charter, Edith Kaspin, and Judy Bambace.  The event included a reception, silent auction, three-course dinner, and awards presentation.

The highlight of the evening was keynote speaker Jennifer Granholm, the first woman to be elected as Michigan’s Governor in 2002.   She served two terms as Governor, leading a state with a $40 billion annual budget and more than 55,000 employees.  She pioneered clean energy innovation and economic development and led Michigan through the national economic crisis in the automotive and manufacturing sectors.

Former Governor Granholm gave an impassioned, entertaining and inspiring speech, encouraging us to fight for victory in the upcoming elections and reminding all of us about the fundamental Democratic value of taking care of each other like family.  

Thank You – Thank You – Thank You

A very big thank you must go out to eight of our fellow club members who gave up their Saturday morning  to register voters. Rather than sleeping late or lounging about with their coffee they were at 3rd and B Street in Civic Theater Plaza meeting, congratulating and registering new citizens who had just completed their Naturalization Ceremony in Golden Hall.

Thank you Judy Bambace, Patricia Cowett, Lori Doyle, Diana Greenspan, Jerry Greenspan, Kathleen Kilby, Connie Pinkus and Barbara Simon for a job well done.

Once a month (on Wednesday mornings) this Naturalization  Ceremony takes place in Golden Hall and volunteers are always needed to help these new citizens with the process of registering to vote. Our club had committed to having volunteers there once a year, however any of us can volunteer to  help when it is convenient for you. Take along a friend on any of the following dates. They will be 4/18/18,  5/16/18, (both meet at 10:00 AM) 6/20/18 & 7/11/18 (will have two sessions, 10:00 AM and again at 2:30PM. For more information call or email Mercy Mandelbaum at (619) 435-1911, [email protected]

Coronado’s Annual Independence Day Parade

Yes, it’s time to mark your calendar and join us to march in Coronado’s Fourth of July parade.  When you participate in this city-wide event, you demonstrate to our community that there are many Democrats here in Coronado and that we have an active, vibrant club.

So plan now to be a part of this year’s celebration. You, your family and friends can join the fun :
1.Ride a bicycle, or walk, children on scooters or wagons, etc. are welcome too.
2. We have electric cars and a convertible

We supply the decorations. All you’ll need to do is RSVP your participation and then pick up festive 4th decorations during the week before the parade at 442 I Ave, Coronado.

You will receive an email with the location and time we’ll meet prior to the parade.

On parade day we encourage everyone to wear any past Democratic Club tee shirt you may have whether you are in the parade or a spectator. So get out those old shirts and get them ready for the big day.

Further details will be forthcoming.  If you need to ride in a car, want to RSVP, and/or have questions, contact Patti Flores-Charter at (H) (619) 437-1952 (C) (619) 206-7450 or [email protected]

We can’t wait to celebrate with you and the rest of our city on July 4th.

President’s Message – May 2018

“The partisan primary system, which favors more ideologically pure candidates, has contributed to the election of more extreme officeholders and increased political polarization. It has become a menace to governing.”
— Sen. Charles Schumer (D-NY)

During my conversations with fellow Democrats, the subject of ideological purity v. winning elections occasionally arises. We in California are fortunate to have all statewide constitutional offices, and majorities of both houses of the Legislature and our Congressional delegation safely in the hands of the Democratic Party.

Primary election voters of both Democratic and Republican parties often have a tendency to vote for the most ideologically pure candidate. This isn’t necessarily a problem in states or districts where the general election outcome isn’t in doubt; however, in “swing” states or districts, general election voters (including independents) may prefer candidates who reside closer to the center of the ideological spectrum.

Some election reforms have been tried in an effort to moderate primary election outcomes. One is the “open” primary, in which any voters may vote in a party’s primary election. Another is the “top-two” primary (sometimes called “jungle” primary), in which candidates from all parties are grouped together on one ballot, and the two candidates receiving the most votes advances  to the general election. California is one of three states that uses a top-two primary in partisan elections (the others are Louisiana and Washington; Nebraska uses an open primary for its officially non-partisan legislative races).

The idea behind “open” and “top-two” primary elections was that if all voters, not just those registered with a particular party, could vote for any party’s candidates, it would result in more  moderate candidates advancing to the general election. Whether this is the case remains a subject of intense research and discussion among political scientists.

In recent special elections, those Democratic candidates who managed to get elected in traditionally Republican states or districts held positions that hewed more closely to their electorate’s beliefs than Democratic candidates one might find in a Democratic stronghold. In California, we have an opportunity to “flip” a number of Congressional seats from “red” to “blue;” two of these are all or partially in San Diego County. Would an ideologically pure candidate or one who is perceived to be more moderate have a better chance of winning such a contest?

Some primary voters “sincerely” vote for candidates who adhere to their own personal beliefs; other, “strategic” voters will try to elect the candidate who has the best chance of winning the general election for their party. Which kind of voter are you?

– Frank King                   

At our May Meeting: Dunkin’ Hunter: Replacing a Corrupt Congressman

Join us at our May 2 meeting, where we’ll talk about beating Duncan Hunter Jr., San Diego’s embattled 50th Congressional District representative, who comes with a host of ethical and financial irregularities. Hunter is up for re-election this year, and the club is backing a strong Democratic contender – La Mesa native Ammar Campa-Najjar, who’s one of our speakers at the meeting.

Our other speaker is Jon “Bowzer” Bauman, a Democratic Party activist who became famous in the 1960s and 70s as led singer for the oldies group Sha Na Na.

Hunter’s troubles started in 2016 when the Federal Election Commission (FEC) began examining his use of campaign funds for personal expenses such as video games, flying a rabbit on a plane, tuition, family vacations and much more.

Although Hunter has reviewed his campaign spending and reimbursed his treasury more than $60,000 in expenses he identified as “personal, mistaken or undocumented,” he is currently under a Department of Justice criminal investigation for alleged campaign finance violations.

Ammar-2

Ammar Campa-Najjar

Campa-Najjar left La Mesa as a boy, along with his family, for the Gaza Strip in 1998. When war made it unsafe to stay, he returned with his mother and brother to San Diego. After graduating from San Diego State University with dual bachelor’s degrees in philosophy and psychology, Campa-Najjar joined President Obama’s reelection campaign as Deputy Regional Field Director, overseeing Southern California’s grassroots operations from a headquarters in San Diego. During the Obama Administration he served in the Labor Department’s Office of Public Affairs for the Employment and Training Administration.He is a staunch advocate for unions and small businesses owned by minorities, women, immigrants and veterans. Citing bipartisan support for the Registered Apprenticeship job training initiative, Campa-Najjar has called on the Trump administration to expand and strengthen the program. His platform also includes Medicare for All, passing a clean Dream Act, investing in renewable energy, and overturning Citizens United.

Find more information about Campa-Najjar’s campaign can be found at www.campacampaign.com

bauman pic2-2

Jon “Bowzer”Bauman

Bauman, our other speaker, is the uncle of Eric Bauman, the chairman of the California Democratic Party.

Born in Brooklyn, Bauman started attending The Juilliard School at age 12 and graduated magna cum laude from Columbia College in New York.

In 1969, he partnered with several Columbia classmates to create Sha Na Na. They sang at Woodstock, and later starred on a syndicated television variety series with the same name. Bauman’s character, “Bowzer,” was a blustery, dimwitted skinny-armed greaser in a muscle shirt.

In real life, Bauman is no dope; he campaigns regularly for Democrats in special elections and endorsed Barack Obama for President in 2008. He has also worked as a spokesman for the National Committee to Preserve Social Security and Medicare and recorded wake-up calls for employees of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. Bauman is co-founder of the group Senior Votes Count, a political action committee designed to elect leaders to protect and advance the rights of older Americans.

In the 2016 presidential election, Bauman endorsed Hillary Clinton and campaigned across the country.

He is currently President of Social Security Works PAC, a national organization working to elect candidates who support protecting and expanding Social Security benefits. Bauman lives in Los Angeles with his wife Mary.

Find out about Bauman’s performing career at Bowzer’s Rock N’ Roll Party.

Join us Wednesday, May 2 at 6:30 pm for social time, 7 pm for programming, at the La Mesa Community Center, 4975 Memorial Drive in La Mesa.

 

Fayaz Nawabi in The Washington Post

Democrats for Equality,

“Nawabi, a 31-year-old candidate for San Diego City Council, supports almost everything that Trump opposes: He is pro-affordable housing, pro-environment, pro-immigrant and pro-refugee. That makes him part of the blue wave of new liberal candidates spurred to run by Trump’s election and policies.

But Nawabi is also part of a notable subset: the blue Muslim wave.”

Our endorsed candidate Fayaz Nawabi was highlighted by The Washington Post this week for San Diego City Council in District 6.

According to the story, there are 90 American Muslims running for office across the country, most spurred to run for office in the wake of the Trump presidency.

Take some time to check out the article and the video highlights.

We are so proud of you Fayaz! This is your moment, and the San Diego Democrats for Equality is proud to stand behind your historic candidacy.

If you’d like to learn more about Fayaz, check out his campaign website — votefornawabi.com — and, sign-up, volunteer, and/or donate to his campaign.

Like The Post says… wouldn’t be nice to deliver some “sweet justice” this year?

In Solidarity,

Ryan Trabuco
Vice President for Resource Development
San Diego Democrats for Equality